Movies

Movie review: 'Mission Impossible: Fallout'

Tom Cruise is back with another high efficiency spy thriller

By Rick Romancito
tempo@taosnews.com
Posted 8/5/18

Tom Cruise's latest, "Mission Impossible: Fallout," is an impressive high-tech machine of a movie. You can practically see the finely wrought titanium gears spinning …

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Movies

Movie review: 'Mission Impossible: Fallout'

Tom Cruise is back with another high efficiency spy thriller

Posted

Tom Cruise's latest, "Mission Impossible: Fallout," is an impressive high-tech machine of a movie. You can practically see the finely wrought titanium gears spinning effortlessly as each shot unspools to give his audience a maximum thrill ride.

Even the star himself seems born to play Ethan Hunt: a character his own loving wife is willing to let go to keep the world safe from terrorists and megalomaniacal madmen envisioned by an actor well-known for his spectacular commitment to hitting his marks better than anyone on the planet.

At around two and a half hours, "Fallout" is the longest in the MI franchise, but every moment is clipped to offer a precision second fit snugly into the next for maximum impact.

The subtitle, "Fallout," is of course a double meaning referring to the consequences Ethan and his IMF team face when a snap decision to save a friend results in the loss of nuclear weapon cores to an evil mastermind. Once they recover from that boo-boo, the team is faced with having to find the cores, figure out how to get them back and stave off a nuclear disaster.

Of course, hearkening back to the old TV series on which the movie franchise is based, the team gets to employ a variety of disguises and high-tech devices to keep their enemies guessing.

For the first time in the movie series, a handful of characters return from the previous outing. Most notable is the beautiful Ilsa Faust (Rebecca Ferguson), a severely compromised former British MI6 agent who seems to pop up at the most inopportune time for reasons we'll eventually discover and the bad guy Solomon Lane (Sean Harris) whose philosophy is summed up in this snippet of dialogue: "There cannot be peace without first, a great suffering. The greater the suffering, the greater the peace. The end you've always feared is coming. It's coming, and the blood will be on your hands."

Oo, scary.

Of course, Ethan is undeterred by this and remains focused on his mission, even if he and his team, Luther Stickell (Ving Rhames) and Benji Dunn (Simon Pegg), have to improvise now and then, much to the dismay of their covert handlers Alan Hunley (Alec Baldwin) and Erica Sloan (Angela Bassett).

If you've seen the series, you know that Ethan has been torn between his rock 'em, sock 'em day job and his desire to be a regular old husband to his one true love, Julia (Michelle Monahan), but that the two roles are incompatible.

Well, here we discover how that situation finally worked out. And, we also find out what's really going on between he and Ilsa.

You'd think he was James Bond or Superman.

Speaking of the latter, Henry Cavill, who played The Man of Steel once or twice, is here to tower over Cruise in a role that doesn't seem to offer much except to make him look rather impressive doing just about anything.

"Fallout" is not bad. But, for those who have a hard time dealing with nonstop knuckle-biting action for almost two-and-a-half hours straight, maybe something else might be more your style.

"Mission Impossible: Fallout" is rated PG-13 for violence and intense sequences of action and for brief strong language.

It is showing daily at Mitchell Storyteller 7 Theatres, 110 Old Talpa Cañón Road. For show times, tickets and additional information, call (575) 751-4245 or visit storyteller7.com.

Also showing in Taos

The following were compiled from press materials.

Teen Titans Go! To the Movies

MPAA rating: PG for action and rude humor

Mitchell Storyteller 7


It seems to the Teens that all the major superheroes out there are starring in their own movies—everyone but the Teen Titans, that is. But de facto leader Robin (voiced by Scott Menville) is determined to remedy the situation,and be seen as a star instead of a sidekick. If only they could get the hottest Hollywood film director to notice them.

With a few madcap ideas and a song in their heart, the Teen Titans head to Tinsel Town, certain to pull off their dream. But when the group is radically misdirected by a seriously super villain and his maniacal plan to take over the Earth, things really go awry. The team finds their friendship and their fighting spirit failing, putting the very fate of the Teen Titans themselves on the line.

This is the first from the Teen Titans TV series to get its own big screen feature film. Directed by Aaron Horvath and Peter Rida Michail, this animated film features the voice talents of Will Arnett, Nicolas Cage, Kristen Bell and Michael Bolton.

This film will be screened daily.

Mitchell Storyteller 7 Theatres, 110 Old Talpa Cañón Road. For show times, tickets and additional information, call (575) 751-4245 or visit storyteller7.com.

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

MPAA rating: PG-13 for some thematic elements and language

Movies at the TCA


Charmingly soft-spoken and yet powerfully incisive expressing his profound ideals, Fred Rogers was a unique presence on television for generations.

Through interviews with his family and colleagues, the life of this would-be pastor is explored as a man who found a more important calling: to provide an oasis for children in a video sea of violent bombardment.

That proved to be his landmark series, “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” (1968), a show that could gently delve into important subjects no other children’s show would have dared to talk about in that time.

In doing so, Rogers experienced a career where his sweet-tempered idealism charmed and influenced the world whether it be scores of children on TV or recalcitrant authorities in government. However, that beloved personality also hid Rogers’ deep self-doubts about himself and occasional misjudgments even as he proved a rock of understanding in times of tragedy for a world that did not always comprehend a man of such noble character.

Directed by Morgan Neville, this film features commentary by Joanne Rogers, Betty Aberlin, Robert F. Kennedy, Al Gore, Lyndon Johnson, Hillary and Bill Clinton, Yo-Yo Ma, Christa McAuliffe and Tom Snyder among many others.

This film will be screened at 2 p.m. Sunday (Aug. 5), and at 7 p.m. Monday through Wednesday (Aug. 6-8).

Movies at the TCA film series, Taos Community Auditorium, 145 Paseo del Pueblo Norte. For tickets and additional information, call the Taos Center for the Arts at (575) 758-2052 or visit tcataos.org.

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