KNOW YOUR NEIGHBOR: Marti Segura

Broadcaster turned horticulturist enjoys range of outdoor activities

By Kathy Córdova
For The Taos News
Posted 9/19/19

Marti Segura stands at 4 feet, 11 inches and weighs 110 pounds, but don't let her size fool you.That tiny frame is packed with energy. Her careers have spanned …

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KNOW YOUR NEIGHBOR: Marti Segura

Broadcaster turned horticulturist enjoys range of outdoor activities

Posted

Marti Segura stands at 4 feet, 11 inches and weighs 110 pounds, but don't let her size fool you.

That tiny frame is packed with energy. Her careers have spanned broadcasting to horticulture and she's kept herself busy in her free time cooking, gardening and engaged in outdoor activities.

"There are a number of interests in which I'm involved. It's all good, and all my activities keep me happy," shared Segura during a recent interview.

Family

Segura did not reside in the Taos area full time until three years ago. However, she visited family (especially her grandma, Sadie Aguilar) in Cerro during her childhood. Marti Segura grew up in Colorado, Dallas/Fort Worth and Austin.

Parents Susan Córdova (Toole, Utah) and the late Ernest Segura (Cerro, New Mexico) raised four children. Miguel (Allison) Segura lives in Austin, Texas. Natalia (Jacob) Anderson raises two elementary school-age daughters in Austin. Adriana Segura (Clarence Calhoun II) and her son, Clarence Calhoun III, reside in Chicago.

Career

Before moving to New Mexico, Segura studied social work in Austin, Texas. Her move to New Mexico opened many possibilities and areas of interest.

In the beginning, Segura worked in broadcast journalism. At DMC Broadcasting in Taos, her roles included news, production director and DJ for three years. At Hutton Broadcasting in Santa Fe, she spent three years working on promotions and as a DJ. As an on-air personality, Segura greatly enjoyed participation in both start-up radio groups in Taos and Santa Fe.

For a time, Segura continued work in the journalism field, but this time in print. She worked as a freelance writer and in classified ads for the Taos News. Newspaper work allowed her to publish her landscape photos. At the Taos News, she also wrote stories about the region and nature. Segura worked as a team with the late Spanish page editor Jerry Padilla; she wrote the column "Old and New Trails" and Padilla translated the column into Spanish for El Crepúsculo.

"My work and enjoyment in the literary field caused me to change majors," related Segura. When she decided to return to university studies, Segura completed her Bachelor of Arts degree in English/professional writing at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque.

Past professional affiliation included both broadcast and print media. In 2005, Segura received an award from the New Mexico Broadcasters Association for Best Complete Newscast. She served as the Zia Award Chairman for New Mexico Press Women. In this role she headed a search for the best book by a New Mexico author. Former Ambassador to Honduras Mari-Luci Jaramillo won the coveted award for her book "Madame Ambassador: The Shoemaker's Daughter."

Segura made a change from journalism to gardening. For the past nine years, she has worked at All Season's Gardening in Santa Fe where she studied horticulture.

Spare time

Segura's spare time activities require a lot of energy. She is a parciante and as such helps with her irrigation ditch. As a member of the 7-mile-long Cerro de Guadalupe Ditch #4, she learns as she works. Segura considers herself a cultivator, nurturing her garden of flowers and medicinal herbs.

Some of Segura's free time serves as a creative outlet. She uses a notebook to record her observations, historical documentation and current events. Her photographs share the subject of beautiful Northern New Mexico landscapes.

Her cooking features seasonal foods - fruit and vegetables. "I enjoy local beef and other meat, but it has to be local," said Segura. The cook doesn't favor one specific type of food or ethnic flavor.

Outdoor activities, besides working at the ditch, include what Segura terms "seasonal stuff" such as hiking, fishing, walking and in the winter and skiing. "I love being outdoors," she added.

Several years ago, Segura felt the call to use her talent and creativity on the stage. She performed such roles as Vato in "No Saco Nada de la Escuela." Last year, she participated in The Paseo Project in a role for "Private Party," a live film shoot. The latter segment was performed by affiliates of Las Pistoleras Instituto Cultural de Arte.

When it comes to her favorite things in life, it is all about nature and the beautiful Northern New Mexico landscapes: "Rain, water, snow and Cerro," she said.

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