Opinion: How a disagreement can become the basis of community

Michael Reynolds, Taos County
Posted 4/18/19

The Greater World Community is possibly the only legal subdivision development in the world that effectively and sustainably addresses all six of the main issues of human sustenance. Those issues …

You have exceeded your story limit for this 30-day period.

Please log in to continue

Log in

Opinion: How a disagreement can become the basis of community

Posted

The Greater World Community is possibly the only legal subdivision development in the world that effectively and sustainably addresses all six of the main issues of human sustenance. Those issues being:

- comfortable shelter that needs no fossil fuel;

- water from the sky;

- electricity not sourced from the grid;

- reuse of what we call garbage in the building itself;

- contained on-site zero discharge sewage systems;

- food production potential year-round in the home itself.

I won and lost many battles to bring this community into existence. People come from around the world to experience it.

It is fully ironic that an asphalt production plant now wants to happen right next door.

The members of the GWC/Subdivision are up in arms about this relative to smell, health hazards and property values being affected. I have more to lose than any one member due to the fact that the community is only about two-thirds developed. I as developer have many lots and homes still to develop and sell.

So … is the asphalt plant another battle to fight? My opinion is only my own as I am no longer the boss of the community. I turned it over to a board of directors in 2005. We have been operating as a Home Owner Association ever since and after the HOA Act happened in 2013, we registered as an HOA in 2015.

When I look at the six things we are providing for ourselves without infrastructure, I see that while these provide for human sustenance, it is not the whole picture. We all drive on the asphalt roads around the county that are built with small asphalt production plants. In view of this, I do not see the owner of the asphalt production plant as a villain, rather as just another person in the county who has been here for decades providing something we all need and use.

This makes me want to expand our thinking to include this scenario. How do we produce asphalt with zero (or close to zero) emissions? Yes, we could just say do it somewhere else but it would still be putting poison into the air of Taos Valley. We all live here. We all use asphalt roads. We all have a problem to address.

While I am not educated enough on the subject to offer the absolute detailed solution, I know it exists. So instead I am suggesting an approach to this and other problems like it as opposed to entering into another war where only lawyers come out good. It is a step-by-step approach.

Step One - We visualize the concept of a solution as opposed to just fighting;

Step Two - We initiate tangible threads of a solution rather than just fighting;

Step Three - We begin to weave those threads together into a real fabric.

This fabric becomes community.

We all live here in peace.

Michael Reynolds is a longtime architect who created passive solar Earthship designs and lives in Taos County.

Comments


Private mode detected!

In order to read our site, please exit private/incognito mode or log in to continue.